15 Responses

  1. Michele Peterson
    Michele Peterson at |

    Wow, that’s big news! The move, that is…although the bubblegum pink buddha might be surprising to some. Me, I just cart large statues of Virgins with me from house to house – the heavier the better it seems. BTW You do have a hat waiting in Mexico and a buddha can be arranged. I just can’t guarantee it will be pink.

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  2. Karen Gamble
    Karen Gamble at |

    Thank you for the challenge. I shared my favorite things in a gift exchange this Christmas. Really got me to think about what are my fave things to share with someone. And now I’ll decide what is most valuable of my “things”. Could make for Good writing material!

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  3. Elinor
    Elinor at |

    As a clutter consultant, I have thought of that often, since I help people de-clutter and have hopefully learned a thing or two about attachments.
    In case of emergency, my passport (identification, travel ticket) and laptop (business records), get grabbed first. Other items I am not so clear about, but I do love my toy tractor I won around age 5 when I was with my dad at a Massey Ferguson day pancake breakfast.
    I actually think it would be both heart-wrenching and liberating. Think about all the things we would happily leave behind that are not the priority over health and happiness. That’s the potential clutter.
    Good luck with your partings.

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  4. Laurie
    Laurie at |

    Love the ‘King and Queen of Schleppage’, though I despair of ever getting up to Dakota Ridge snowshoeing with you, what with the toing and froing that seems to be mostly going from the Coast :)

    This reminds me of when I was on one of those ghastly but so effective personal development seminars. It was in Surrey at the Sheraton at 152 and 104th, near the freakishly big Canadian flag that can likely be seen from space. But, I digress.

    About 3 days in to the exorcism of personal demons, right when everyone (69 people and staff/trainers) was at their most psychologically fragile point, the fire alarm went off at about 1:30 am. It was like a klaxon! My roommate and I – gloriously well-suited to each other and still friends 8 years later – scrambled to get out of the room and down 17 flights of stairs. Leaving the room I gave one final exhortation to grab important stuff, selecting for myself my wallet, shoes, a light sweater, my phone and my dogeared notebook from the sessions.

    Sandy, on the other hand, emerged into the June overnight chill in socks and pajamas, clutching an apple. We still laugh about it to this day.

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  5. Laurie
    Laurie at |

    Great sharing! I feel as I get older, it is the items that my father and I built together. He was very good at carvings with driftwood and woodwork, and I think those would be the first to go! Your pink Buddha is hilarious!

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  6. Angie Mizzell
    Angie Mizzell at |

    I’ve actually thought about this… like if the house caught fire and I had time to grab things. My wedding album, the boxed-up wedding dress, my laptop (only because of the photos stored on it, and my plan is to put them all in the cloud, so then I could ditch the laptop), my grandmother’s ring. That’s only 4.

    But since we’re a family of 5, I suppose that doesn’t leave room for anything else. And I’m fine with that. The things listed above are probably the only material things that I would grieve over losing.

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  7. mandy
    mandy at |

    So funny that you posted this shortly after I’d made that list of 5! Since we are out of our house for a couple months in the winter, and because we heat with wood, I think of fire possibilities occasionally…I have made that list too–like Angie.
    1. Cash
    2. Computer/thumb drives
    3. Box of all the film pictures I have stored in the garage
    4. The cedar chest in the bedroom that my husband made for me
    5. Tom’s guns and our fishing poles.

    The rest is just stuff we could conceivably do without forever. Not that I want to have that fire and find out…

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